Home Heating Credit deadline Sept. 30

With the Sept. 30 deadline approaching to file for the Michigan Home Heating Credit, community support workers at FiveCAP, Inc. are available to prepare the application, along with a tax return for income-eligible residents who have not yet filed.

An appointment is required for this service, and should be made as soon as possible to ensure the service can be provided before the deadline.

“As we prepare for another heat season, this is an important piece for many people who struggle to keep the heat on in their homes,” said FiveCAP Executive Director Mary Trucks. “This money offsets the cost of utilities and allows low-income residents to stretch their budget in other areas.”

FiveCAP offers free tax preparation services to low-income residents throughout the year. Many residents who qualify for tax credits aren’t required to fill out income tax returns, which results in missed opportunities.

“A lot of people think the April 15 deadline applies to all tax returns and credits, but it’s only applicable if you owe money back to the government,” Trucks said. “There is still time to claim the money the government owes you.

“Everyone should file a tax return,” she added. “There are a lot of people who don’t realize they could be getting money back every year, so when our community support workers prepare the application for the Home Heating Credit, they will also check to see if there are any other benefits available.”

To apply for the credit, residents must supply their 2013 income, as well as documentation of how much they spent on heating costs between Nov. 1, 2012 and Oct. 31, 2013.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call FiveCAP at (231) 757-3785.

‘It makes you feel good’: Lake County volunteers help FiveCAP provide assistance to people in need

One day, a friend convinced Sue Foster to accompany her to FiveCAP, where she volunteered for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program distribution. The Lake County resident has been volunteering for the agency ever since.

“I enjoy the food distribution and talking with all the people who come in,” Foster said. “It’s a nice group of people I work with and I’ve made friends with the people that come in and help.”

sue 001Foster still helps with the food distribution, but also assists with office operations.

“It’s something to do because before I was laid off from my job, I always worked in a factory,” she said. “Then we moved up here and it was something to do once or twice a week. With the office work, I enjoy when people come in and seeing if I can help them out.”

Volunteers like Foster help in the Lake County office by manning the reception desk, answering the phone, helping clients fill out paperwork, answering some of their questions and directing them to programs and services available to help.

“It’s good experience for anyone who wants to learn how to be a receptionist,” said FiveCAP Community Support Worker Dawn Summers. “One of our volunteers is retired from an office job, so she has a lot of experience and I’ve been able to train her on some of the basic computer work.”

At specific times during the year the agency also needs volunteers to help with annual events. During the annual garden and food preservation workshops, volunteers also help FiveCAP staff sort plants or canning and freezing supplies into individual packages that are given to workshop participants.

“For the garden workshop, they cut and pack up 200 sets of plants and with the food preservation workshop they will cut and pack up 200 sets of canning jars and freezer bags,” Summers said, noting that there are always a wide variety of tasks that the agency depends on volunteers to complete. “For each of our food distribution dates, they help us unload the delivery truck, sort and pack the food and distribute it to the clients.

In June alone, Lake County volunteers clocked nearly 180 hours helping FiveCAP operate its programs for low-income families.

“I couldn’t do my job without the volunteers,” Summers said.

Foster recalled being surprised when she first started volunteering at the number of programs available to low-income families in the community. She encourages other people to find ways to get involved and contribute to these causes.

“I’ve told other people that it might be something for them to do,” she said. “It makes you feel good.”

For more information, or to sign up as a volunteer for FiveCAP’s programs, stop by the Lake County office, located at 2476 West 44th St., in Baldwin, or call (231) 745-4617.

‘A great feeling’: Manistee volunteers help FiveCAP provide assistance to people in need

Carol Witucki enjoys “absolutely everything” about volunteering. Most afternoons, the Manistee County resident can be found at FiveCAP, Inc., helping out with office operations. She also contributes her time when the agency distributes food and hosts self-sufficiency workshops.

She came to the work after she was placed in other service agencies through the Experience Works program.

Manistee Carol 3“I worked … at DHS for a year and at LoveINC for three years, but you can only be in the program for four years so when my time was up, I retired,” Witucki said. “But I liked that kind of work, so I came over here and talked to (FiveCAP Community Support Worker) Julie (Ingison) and I’ve been here every day since.

“I enjoy the people, especially the people I work with. I enjoy going home at night knowing I helped somebody.”

Witucki has recommended volunteering to several people she knows and encourages people to get visit FiveCAP to learn about ways they can contribute. Ingison added that there are a variety of volunteer opportunities for everyone.

“We have a place for volunteers of all ages and abilities,” she said. “Some of our older volunteers can’t use a computer or can’t lift, but they can help clients fill out paperwork. We can always find something for volunteers to do.”

“We have several different things for people to do as volunteers. With food distribution, we need people to pack and carry out the boxes, and we need a lot of people to help unload the truck. Without these volunteers, we would not be able to distribute food on our own.”

Volunteers also help operate FiveCAP’s Manistee County office by manning the reception desk, answering the phone, helping clients fill out paperwork, answering some of their questions and directing them to programs and services available to help.

At specific times during the year the agency also needs volunteers to help with annual events. Each Christmas, the agency collects presents and distributes them to families in need through Toys for Tots/Gifts for Teens. Volunteers help sort and set up the toys and also assist the families as they “shop” for gifts on the day of distribution. During the annual garden and food preservation workshops, volunteers also help FiveCAP staff sort plants or canning and freezing supplies into individual packages that are given to workshop participants.

Manistee Carol 1“I could not do my job without the help of our volunteers,” Ingison said. “The value of their help is hard to put into words.”

Since the beginning of October, FiveCAP has had 64 volunteers contribute more than 1,250 hours during 20 different events, including Toys for Tots/Gifts for Teens, food distributions, workshop and the annual Walk for Warmth fundraiser.

“Some people think they don’t have time to volunteer,” Ingison said, adding there are other ways to contribute to FiveCAP’s programs. “Some people give of resources through pantry, toy and crocheted/knitted hat donations. These are just as valuable. We don’t get a lot of funds to cover our pantry so donations are always helpful. I have two gentlemen that come in every month and get a list of what our pantry needs and goes and purchase it. We call them our pantry angels (they have kept us from having to shut down our pantry all year). This year we exceeded last year’s pantries given back in June and the year is only half over.”

Volunteering can be an eye-opening experience. Witucki said people would be surprised at the number of people in need in the community.

“If you want to give back or put something in your life, it’s a good feeling,” she added. “It’s a great feeling.”

For more information, or to sign up as a volunteer for FiveCAP’s programs, stop by the Manistee County office, located at 265 First St., in Manistee, or call (231) 723-8327.

‘Glad to be a helper’

Mason County volunteers help FiveCAP provide assistance to people in need

At 85 years old, Fred Annand said he feels “great,” and has no desire to spend all his time at home, watching television. Since 2010, the Mason County resident has been volunteering for FiveCAP, Inc. and can often be found helping out at the agency’s food distribution programs.

“It gives me something to do,” Annand said. “I enjoy getting out and having some purpose in life. I enjoy meeting the people as I’m passing the food boxes out and it’s a nice group of people that I work with.”

DSCF2305

FiveCAP Community Support Director Holly Haywood presents a certificate of appreciation to Mason County volunteer Fred Annand for his dedication to the agency’s programs.

Annand is on hand for all of the programs that FiveCAP offers, including the annual self-sufficiency workshops and Toys for Tots/Gifts for Teens at Christmastime.

“I just enjoy the whole thing,” he added.

FiveCAP Community Support Director Holly Haywood said the contribution of volunteers like Annand is essential to the agency’s continued ability to provide services to low-income residents.

“We couldn’t do food distribution without them,” Haywood said, noting that FiveCAP’s service area encompasses four counties and each county has its own office and programs to operate. “We have one staff person for each county and give out more than 1,000 boxes for CSFP (Commodity Supplemental Food Program) and more than 1,500 for TEFAP (The Emergency Food Assistance Program) between all four counties. Without volunteers to unload, pack and distribute the supplies, we couldn’t have these programs.”

While Haywood said she can find a place for anyone who wants to contribute, in Mason County, volunteers are especially needed to help unload the semi that delivers the food for both of its distribution programs.

“We can use volunteers of every age and ability, always,” she said, “but we’re in particular need right now of a couple of people who can do a bit of lifting.”

At specific times during the year the agency also needs volunteers to help with annual events. Each Christmas, the agency collects presents and distributes them to families in need through Toys for Tots/Gifts for Teens. Volunteers help sort and set up the toys and also assist the families as they “shop” for gifts on the day of distribution. During the annual garden and food preservation workshops, volunteers also help FiveCAP staff sort plants or canning and freezing supplies into individual packages that are given to workshop participants.

Annand recommends volunteering to others, and has recruited old friends to join him and made new friends along the way.

“I’ve recommended it to different people,” he said of volunteering. “My neighbors, I talk to them every day and I recommended it to them and they are very involved now too. We pick up (another volunteer) and we all ride together to save on mileage.

“I feel I’m doing something constructive. When I work, I’m accomplishing something. I just think it’s a wonderful program and I’m glad to be a helper. I even ask Holly every once in a while if she has anything else for me to do.”

For more information, or to sign up as a volunteer for FiveCAP’s programs, stop by the Mason County office, located at 302 North Main St., in Scottville, or call (231) 757-3785.

Starting preschool doesn’t have to be a scary experience, for children or their parents

By LISA FISHER, FiveCAP Head Start Education/Disability Specialist

Another school year is about to begin, and we are excited to welcome a new group of 3- and 4-year-olds to Head Start. It’s always fun to see the now worldly 4-year-olds returning for their second year, no longer the shy toddlers they were just 12 months before. They are shining examples of the difference a year can make, and their presence can help reassure their younger schoolmates that school won’t always be so intimidating.

Sometimes, as adults, we need a bit of reassurance as well. Parents who are dropping their kids off for school are often nervous, and for many, the first day of school is also the first day they’ve ever spent an extended amount of time away from their kids.

We find ways to reassure both the children and their parents at the beginning of each school year.

Family involvement is one of the most important aspects of Head Start, and building these relationships starts early when teachers make their first home visit early in the year. This interaction not only introduces the student to the teacher in an environment where the child is comfortable, it also provides parents with the opportunity to interact with the teachers who will be partners in their child’s growth for the year.

For the teachers, this is a chance to see get to know the family as a whole. This is an important step, because the relationship between Head Start and the families it serves isn’t limited to the student currently enrolled in the program. Parents, as their child’s first teachers, are engaged in the preschool process.

Together, teachers and parents discuss each child individually, setting goals for progress. These goals will be revisited at parent teacher conferences throughout the year, and take into account each child’s strengths as well as the ways they are struggling to meet the demands that will be expected of them when they graduate from preschool and move on to kindergarten.

The goals of the family are also developed and shared.

The income guidelines for Head Start require a family be at or below the federal poverty level, which is only $15,730 for a two-person household, and increases by $4,060 for each additional family member. Living in poverty comes with its own set of demands, many of these extremely stressful. Our teachers are familiar with the community, and help parents by providing information referrals to services through FiveCAP and other agencies and organizations.

Many Head Start parents share stories of their own negative experiences in school, where they had difficulties or felt unsuccessful, so our teachers also help transform school into a positive for the children and their parents. Families are encouraged to volunteer in the classrooms, ride the buses and attend field trips with the kids, and are always welcomed as valuable members of the educational experience. Teachers interact with parents, hold them in the highest regard, and treat them with the respect they deserve. In this way, teachers help parents overcome their own inhibitions, and learn to value and support their child’s education.

Family literacy is one of the cornerstones of Head Start, and confidential services are provided to parent who can’t read, or simply struggle with literacy. Being able to read with your children isn’t just important for your child’s emerging literacy, it’s a bonding experience. It’s a way to create positive memories that will last a lifetime, so helping parents who are unable learn to read is so important.

We love being a part of our families’ lives, helping parents embrace their role as their child’s first teacher, and helping them build a foundation of support that will last throughout the rest of their child’s educational career.

We understand that sending a child to preschool can be nerve-wracking, but we promise to help ease the anxiety until the routines of school life become less scary and are simply the norm.

For more information on Head Start enrollment, contact FiveCAP at (231) 757-3785.

Helping raise healthy kids

Head Start provides health and wellness screenings, nutritious meals to students

The educational benefits of a quality preschool program are undeniable. But health and wellness is also a key point of focus for the Head Start program, which provides free preschool to 3- and 4-year-olds whose families are living in poverty.

Good nutrition is important for everyone, but especially young children who are growing in both body and mind.

HEALTHY KIDS 1

Nutrition is an important component of the Head Start program.

“We work to counter the negative effects that food insecurity has on children by providing two complete meals a day, each and every school day,” said FiveCAP Head Start Executive Director Mary Trucks. “Our nutrition program also works to combat the obesity which is becoming more common in children.

“Just looking at the issue from one angle, it’s difficult to understand how food insecurity and obesity are linked, but all you need to do to see the connection is look at the price of things at the grocery store. The healthy foods, like fresh fruits and vegetables, are very expensive while the heavily-processed foods that are high in sugar, salt and fat are cheap. When a parent is trying to feed their family on an extremely limited budget, they are going to try to get the most for their money. Unfortunately, it’s much cheaper to fill a cart with unhealthy food.”

Many children in the U.S. are showing signs of obesity-related illnesses, such as diabetes and heart disease – things previously only worried about by people approaching middle age. Addressing the nutritional needs of children can help prevent these issues from developing.

FiveCAP Head Start has in place a no-sugar policy, offers multiple servings of fruits and vegetables each day and only provides low-fat or skim milk to the children. All eight centers offer full-day preschool, so the students are receiving breakfast, lunch and a snack while they are at school. These meals all adhere to the U.S. Department of Agriculture standards and account for two-thirds of the recommended nutrients a child should receive each day.

In addition to nutrition, other health needs are seen to while a child is enrolled in Head Start. Through a collaborative program with Baldwin Family Health Care, students receive dental health services every six months. A mobile unit allows the hygienist and dentist to perform cleanings and checkups on the children right there in the classroom. Regular hearing and vision screening also helps alert parents to any issues as soon as they develop.

“Parents who are raising children in poverty have so many concerns that many families simply take for granted,” Trucks said. “Long-term health and wellness is essential, but can get put on the backburner when the immediacy of survival is a daily concern. We help parents keep current on all the necessary health issues, and build habits that will help their children live healthy lives.”

For more information, contact FiveCAP at (231) 757-3785.

Coming together to celebrate community

FiveCAP honors parents, volunteers and supporters at annual banquet

Community was the unofficial theme of the night when FiveCAP Head Start gathered parents, supporters and community activists together for the 37th annual Parent Volunteers Honors Banquet, held on Friday, June 6 at Baymont Inn & Suites in Ludington.

PNC w Patti and Jessica Kaminski

PNC with Patti and Jessica Kaminski: Jackie Gielczyk (left) and Kasi Kelley (right) of PNC Bank in Manistee were honored for their dedication to the Grow Up Great program, which allows them to volunteer at the Manistee Child Development Center during work hours. They are pictured with MCDC Director Patti Mantych (second from left) and Early Head Start parent Jessica Kaminski.

One of the basic tenets of Head Start is parent involvement, with teachers engaging the entire family in the education of each child. The annual banquet honored the 248 parents who went above and beyond, dedicating at least 80 hours to the program throughout the school year.

In welcoming the parents to the banquet, FiveCAP Head Start Executive Director Mary Trucks announced that parents dedicated a total of 39,096 hours during this school year and Early Head Start parents added 5,453 hours to their programs.

Bitely Head Start Center won the award for highest average points per classroom, with parents volunteering a total of 2,613 hours during the course of the school year. Bitely is also home to the parent with the highest individual points. Teri Ouderkirk volunteered 573 hours to the program. Amanda Burrows, of Hesperia Area Child Development Center was second in individual points, with a total of 522 hours volunteered.

An Early Head Start parent was honored, as well. Erin Pontiac of Manistee had the highest parent points, having volunteered 234 hours to the program during the past year.

The awards ceremony also showed that it’s not just the parents and the teachers who make up the Head Start community. A host of volunteers from outside the preschool program were also honored for the support they provide for all of FiveCAP’s services, including Toys for Tots/Gifts for Teens and Walk for Warmth, in addition to providing manual labor for the monthly and quarterly food distribution programs.

Highest Center points Bitely

Bitely Head Start Center Director Violet Brown accepts the plaque for the having the highest average parent volunteer hours per classroom for all eight FiveCAP Head Start centers.

“Without volunteers, we wouldn’t be able to provide any of these programs,” FiveCAP Community Support Director Holly Haywood said. “There’s a few people we want to recognize who go above and beyond, never miss an event and at the last minute you can call with a change and they’ll make sure we get it done. Without these volunteers, we wouldn’t be able to provide the services we do.”

Haywood honored Nancee Beach from Lake County, Carol Witucki from Manistee County, Danny Fulton from Newaygo County and Fred Annand from Mason County.

Area businesses and organizations were also honored for their contribution to the FiveCAP community. FiveCAP Executive Director Mary Trucks told those gathered about local contractor Kenner McKie of Big “K” Construction, who works on a lot of the weatherization projects but also provides a great deal of in-kind donations.

She also lauded Family Health Care for their continued partnership in providing health and dental services to the Head Start children.

“There is a long relationship between Family Health Care and FiveCAP,” Trucks said. “Actually, Family Health Care was one of our programs at one time and then we spun it off and it’s still there providing health care and dental services. And I can tell you that Head Start children have the best teeth and they are the healthiest because of Family Health Care.”

Jennifer Howe of Family Health Care was in attendance to accept the certificate of thanks. “Thank you again for allowing us to be a part of your collaboration,” she said. “We’re so proud to work together to serve the community and congratulations to the parents, you make the difference.”

Jackie Gielczyk and Kasi Kelley of PNC Bank in Manistee were also honored for their participation in the Grow Up Great program, which encourages PNC employees to volunteer at the Head Start center during work hours, paying their wages for the time they donate. In addition, for every 40 hours volunteered, PNC donates $1,000 to the center. Because PNC is celebrating 10 years of Grow Up Great, Gielczyk announced that the donation would be doubled for the upcoming year.

“We get to take time out of our workday to go spend time with the kids and we get to play with them – out of our workday. It’s very pleasurable, I can’t even describe it,” Gielczyk said. “I’ve been doing this for three years, Kasi has been doing it for two years and we have some new people that are coming on and will be starting in September.

“I do love this so much. I have to tell you, in March I fell and broke my ankle and couldn’t come to the center, but those kids took their time out of their day and sent me a get well card and it meant so much to me to get that from those kids.”

Kelley also chimed in, saying that she loves the time she spends at the center and couldn’t be prouder to be a part of the program.

Trucks also handed the microphone off to State Rep. Jon Bumstead, who represents Lake and Newaygo counties, and was in attendance for the event.

“I have some special feelings when I see that someone is supporting our programs and our efforts, and when you support Head Start, it’s not just what you do in the classroom,” Trucks said. “Tonight, we have with us a special guest who is sitting quietly in the audience who I don’t get to see much personally, but every year I  notice that there’s one thing that he’s always there and a part of and that’s our Walk for Warmth.”

Bumstead said he didn’t have anything prepared, but thanked the parents for their dedication to the program. “It’s important programming and there’s nothing more important than our kids,” he said. “It’s good to see everybody here and we’ve got to keep these programs going because our most valuable resource is our young kids.”

For more photos from the event, visit our Facebook page.

API donates $1,000 to FiveCAP’s Walk for Warmth

The Northern Michigan Chapter of the American Petroleum Institute recently presented a check for $1,000 to FiveCAP’s Walk for Warmth program, which provides heat assistance to low-income families.

API Donation

API’s Darel Willison presents a check for $1,000 to FiveCAP Executive Director Mary Trucks. The donation will be used to provide heat assistance to families in need through FiveCAP’s Walk for Warmth program.

“API’s thoughtfulness and consideration for those less fortunate is helpful in meeting community needs in a time of limited resources,” said FiveCAP Executive Director Mary Trucks.

The American Petroleum Institute is a national trade association made up of members from all sectors of the oil and natural gas industry. On hand to present the donation to FiveCAP was API’s Darel Willison, who described the northern Michigan chapter as a group of service companies and operators that gets together and discusses their interests in the area.

One part of that discussion hinges around the group’s philanthropic interests. For the last several years, they have made it a priority to contribute to FiveCAP’s Walk for Warmth fund because they feel donating to help people heat their homes is a worthy cause.

“We’ve donated now for four or five years because we want to contribute to those who need funds to help pay for heat, but it also supports our industry as well,” Willison said. “It’s important to give back to those in need. It’s important for people to know that we do care about the community and do give back.

“FiveCAP has such a presence in areas that we operate, so we decided it would be a good place to donate.”

Faced with the ever-present uncertainty regarding funding of government heat assistance programs, FiveCAP relies on the generosity of individuals and businesses, such as API, to provide a solid safety net in the form of Walk for Warmth funds.

Walk for Warmth funds are used in emergency circumstances to help residents who don’t otherwise qualify for state or federal heat assistance programs, or to provide help with those government funds have been exhausted.

FiveCAP Head Start joins Genesis Stars

Community members invited to participate in online community

FiveCAP Head Start is putting out a call to the community to show their support by joining a network of Head Start preschool friends.

genesis stars“We just need some of the people who have showed such amazing support to us over the years to log on and join our groups on Genesis Stars so we can all begin reaping the benefits of this network and expand the experience for our local children and their families,” said FiveCAP Executive Director Mary Trucks.

“This is an exciting opportunity for us to remain connected with the hundreds of people who have been impacted by our Head Start program through the years. Through this network, we also gain access to some great resources. Already, through this program, we are bringing author Rose Rock, mother of comedian Chris Rock, to serve as our keynote speaker for our Head Start Parent Volunteer Honors Banquet June 5 at the Baymont Inn & Suites in Ludington.”

Network membership is free and open to any Head Start alumni, parents, guardians, staff members, employees, volunteers, consultants, trainers, advocates, lobbyists or corporate friends. Once members, community advocates can log in and join one or both of the groups, FiveCAP, Inc. and FiveCAP, Inc. Alumni Group.

To join the network go to www.mygenesisstars.com and click “create an account.” Guided by prompts, fill out the membership information until prompted to click “register.” Once this is complete, you will be sent an email asking that you activate your account. Click on the link, activate and then go to “my groups” and search “FiveCAP.” The agency has two groups, “FiveCAP, Inc.” and “The FiveCAP, Inc. Alumni Group.” Members can join both groups.

CSFP providing food to seniors, families on March 12

FiveCAP will be distributing the Commodity Supplemental Food Program boxes on Wednesday, March 12. This program provides food every other month to income-eligible senior citizens.

“As any senior will tell you, getting older costs a lot of money,” FiveCAP Community Support Director Holly Haywood said. “The increasing cost of living that comes with increased medical expenses, the cost of prescriptions and the physical limitations that can make working difficult or impossible all put elderly residents in a very difficult position.

“This program is nice because it provides food to these residents, allowing them to stretch their budget a little bit. When you’re living on a fixed income, every little bit helps and this program goes a long way for its recipients.”

Residents of FiveCAP’s four-county service area are eligible to receive CSFP if they are 60 or older and their income falls within 130 percent of poverty. For a one-person household, this equates to $15,171 annually and increases by $5,278 for each additional household member.

“This program is distributed to individuals, not families, so only one person in the household needs to meet the age requirement,” Haywood explained. “Having a younger spouse or children living at home doesn’t disqualify people from the program.”

Another program, CSFP-MIC (Mothers, Infants and Children) provides the same supplies seniors receive to income-eligible families with children under 6 that don’t receive WIC (Women, Infants and Children). Families qualify to receive food through CSFP-MIC if their income is within 185 percent, which is $29,100.50 for a two-person household and increases by $7,511 for each additional member.

Below is a list of items that will be included as well as times and locations for each of our four counties.

NEWAYGO COUNTY

The March distribution of Commodity Supplemental Food Program will include boxed milk, non-fat dry milk, macaroni, spaghetti, rolled oats, rice crisp cereal, light red kidney beans, Great Northern beans, canned beef, chunky beef stew, sweet potatoes, spinach, diced tomatoes, corn, apricots, peaches, apple juice, grape juice, cranapple juice, tomato juice and cheese.

Distribution will take place on Wednesday, March 12 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Newaygo County FiveCAP office, located at 434 North Evergreen Dr., in White Cloud. For more information, call (231) 689-6688 or stop by the office.

LAKE COUNTY

The March distribution of Commodity Supplemental Food Program will include boxed milk, non-fat dry milk, macaroni, spaghetti, rolled oats, rice crisp cereal, light red kidney beans, Great Northern beans, canned beef, chunky beef stew, sweet potatoes, spinach, diced tomatoes, corn, apricots, peaches, apple juice, grape juice, cranapple juice, tomato juice and cheese.

Distribution will take place on Wednesday, March 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lake County FiveCAP office, located at 2476 West 44th St., in Baldwin. For more information, call (231) 745-4617 or stop by the office.

MASON COUNTY

The March distribution of Commodity Supplemental Food Program will include boxed milk, non-fat dry milk, macaroni, spaghetti, rolled oats, rice crisp cereal, light red kidney beans, Great Northern beans, canned beef, chunky beef stew, sweet potatoes, spinach, diced tomatoes, corn, apricots, peaches, apple juice, grape juice, cranapple juice, tomato juice and cheese.

Distribution will take place on Wednesday, March 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at FiveCAP’s Johnson Road warehouse, in Scottville. For more information, call (231) 757-3785 or stop by the Mason County office, located at 302 North Main St., in Scottville.

MANISTEE COUNTY

The March distribution of Commodity Supplemental Food Program will include boxed milk, non-fat dry milk, macaroni, spaghetti, rolled oats, rice crisp cereal, light red kidney beans, Great Northern beans, canned beef, chunky beef stew, sweet potatoes, spinach, diced tomatoes, corn, apricots, peaches, apple juice, grape juice, cranapple juice, tomato juice and cheese.

Distribution will take place on Wednesday, March 12 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Manistee County FiveCAP office, located at 265 First St., in Manistee. For more information, call (231) 723-8327 or stop by the office.